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Tuesday, April 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of magnitude and costs of groundwater contamination from agricultural chemicals found in the catalog.

magnitude and costs of groundwater contamination from agricultural chemicals

Elizabeth G. Nielsen

magnitude and costs of groundwater contamination from agricultural chemicals

a national perspective

by Elizabeth G. Nielsen

  • 166 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published by United States Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in Washington, D.C. (1301 New York Ave., Washington 20005-4788) .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Groundwater -- Pollution -- Economic aspects -- United States.,
    • Agricultural pollution -- Economic aspects -- United States.,
    • Agricultural chemicals -- Environmental aspects -- United States.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 32-35.

      StatementElizabeth G. Nielsen, Linda K. Lee.
      SeriesAgricultural economic report ;, no. 576
      ContributionsLee, Linda K. 1950-, United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economic Research Service.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHC110.W32 N54 1987
      The Physical Object
      Pagination38 p. :
      Number of Pages38
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2495444M
      LC Control Number87602606

      The tens of billions of dollars being spent on groundwater pollution problems in the U.S. has made it the number one priority among environmental issues. In Europe, over $5 billion per year is being spent to reverse the current damage done by groundwater pollution and to prevent groundwater contamination. Groundwater Short CoursesFile Size: KB. Environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing in the United States has been an issue of public concern, and includes the contamination of ground and surface water, methane emissions, air pollution, migration of gases and hydraulic fracturing chemicals and radionuclides to the surface, the potential mishandling of solid waste, drill cuttings, increased seismicity and associated effects on human. As in surface water contamination, agricultural practices play a major role in groundwater contamination. Agricultural practices that have the potential to contaminate groundwater include fertilizer and pesticide applications, animal feedlots, irrigation practices, agricultural chemical facilities, and drainage wells.


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magnitude and costs of groundwater contamination from agricultural chemicals by Elizabeth G. Nielsen Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. The magnitude and costs of groundwater contamination from agricultural chemicals: a national perspective. [Elizabeth G Nielsen; Linda K Lee; United States. Department of Agriculture. Economic Research Service.]. Magnitude and costs of groundwater contamination from agricultural chemicals.

[Washington, DC]: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Natural Resource Economics Division, [] (OCoLC) The magnitude and costs of groundwater contamination from agricultural chemicals: a national perspective by Nielsen, Elizabeth G; Lee, Linda K; United States.

Department of Agriculture. Natural Resource Economics Division. Downloadable. Evidence is mounting that agricultural pesticide and fertilizer applications are causing groundwater contamination in some parts of the United States. A synthesis of national data has enabled researchers to identify regions potentially affected by contamination from pesticides and fertilizers and to estimate the number of people in these regions who rely on groundwater for their Cited by: The Magnitude and Costs of Groundwater Contamination From Agricultural Chemicals: A National Perspective.

By Elizabeth G. Nielsen and Linda K. Lee. Resources and Technology Division, Econonriic Research Service, U.S. Depart- ment of Agriculture. Agricultural Economic Report No. Abstract. The magnitude and costs of groundwater contamination from agricultural chemicals: a national perspective / By Elizabeth G.

Nielsen, Linda K. (Linda Kay) Lee and United States. Dept. of Agriculture. to the uncertainty regarding the determination of their actual levels of care. chemical beneficiaries will incur additional precaution costs and will reduce the manufacture. sale. and use of agricultural chemicals to a greater extent than is justified by the additional reduction in groundwater contamination.

Unfortunately, this book can't be printed from the OpenBook. If you need to print pages from this book, we recommend downloading it as a PDF. Visit to get more information about this book, to buy it in print, or to download it as a free PDF.

The magnitude and cost of groundwater contamination from agricultural chemicals: a national perspective. [Google Scholar] 8. Ward MH, Nuckols JR, Weigel SJ, Maxwell SK.

Identifying populations potentially exposed to agricultural pesticides using remote sensing and a. Contamination of ground water can result in poor drinking water quality, loss of water supply, degraded surface water systems, high cleanup costs, high costs for alternative water supplies, and/or potential health problems.

The consequences of contaminated ground water or degraded surface water are often serious. also add to the nitrate contamination of groundwater (Jack and Sharma, ). This paper presents an attempt to discus agriculture oriented environmental problems and highlights the experiments conducted to realize the best management practices BMP’s to mitigate ground water contamination.

Agro-Chemicals:. The Magnitude and Costs of Ground Water Contamination from Agricultural Chemicals – A National Persp. Agriculture is also cited as a leading cause of groundwater pollution in the United States. Infully forty-nine of fifty states identified that nitrate was the principal groundwater contaminant, followed closely by the pesticide category (Table 4).

Recent estimates suggest that surface water damages from soil erosion and associated runoff of agricultural chemicals in the United States were on the order of $9 billion annually (Ribaudo, ). Groundwater contamination by leaching of agricultural chemicals has also become a serious concern nationwide (Patrick, et al, ).Cited by: 7.

The accelerated use of agricultural chemicals over the past 20 to 30 years has profitably increased production but has also had an adverse impact on ground water quality in many of the major agricultural areas of the world.

The pollution of ground water, related to nitrogen fertilizers and pesticides, from widespread, routine land application, as well as point sources has become a serious Cited by: PDF | OnGabriel Pérez-Lucas and others published Environmental Risk of Groundwater Pollution by Pesticide Leaching through the Soil Profile | Find, read and cite all the research.

The Investigation and Assessment on Groundwater Organic Pollution. By Hongqi Wang, Shuyuan Liu and Shasha Du. Submitted: May 24th Reviewed: September 19th Published: January 30th DOI: /Author: Hongqi Wang, Shuyuan Liu, Shasha Du. The magnitude and costs of groundwater contamination from agricultural chemicals: A national perspective.

Washington DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural (). The marginal value of job safety: a contingent valuation study. ().Author: Clevo Wilson. Inworld pesticide use exceeded five billion pounds, with a value of about US$32 billion. The many hundreds of agricultural chemicals, like pharmaceuticals, have evolved rapidly since the midth century toward improved specificity, efficacy, and safety profiles.

CHAPTER 2 Sources of Groundwater Contamination The first step in groundwater contamination risk assessment is to identify potential contaminant sources. As described in the introductory chapter, source identification and characterization can be more difficult for groundwater than for other environmental pathways.

This is due to a number of Size: KB. times in groundwaters are generally orders of magnitude longer than in surface waters (see Table ). Once polluted, a groundwater body could remain so for decades, or even for hundreds of years, because the natural processes of through-flushing are so slow.

Secondly, there is a considerable degree of physico-chemical and chemical. Concern about the fate of agriculture chemicals led the Hawaii State Department of Agriculture to initiate a large sampling program to characterize the sources of nonpoint ground water contamination. In July10 wells in central Oahu were closed because of DBCP and EDB contamination.

Groundwater contamination. Water quality surveys in Puerto Rico have shown a vast contamination of the northern karst aquifer (Guzmán-Ríos et al., ). Of great concern has been the contamination with chlorinated chemicals, which have been measured in a Cited by:   Pesticide contamination of groundwater is a subject of national importance because groundwater is used for drinking water by about 50 percent of the Nation's population.

This especially concerns people living in the agricultural areas where pesticides are most often used, as about 95 percent of that population relies upon groundwater for. agricultural activities can all affect groundwater quality. Contamination of groundwater can result in poor drinking water quality, loss of water supply, high cleanup costs, high costs for alternative water supplies, and or potential health problems.

The quality of ground water depends on various chemical File Size: KB. @article{osti_, title = {Ground water contamination and costs of pesticide restrictions in the southeastern coastal plain}, author = {Danielson, L.E. and Carlson, G.A. and Liu, S. and Weber, J.B.

and Warren, R.}, abstractNote = {The project developed new methodology for estimating: (1) groundwater contamination potential (GWCP) in the Southeast Coastal Plain, and (2) the potential.

Nicholas P. Cheremisinoff Ph.D., in Groundwater Remediation and Treatment Technologies, Prediction of Contaminant Migration. In any groundwater contamination investigation it is essential to obtain the background concentration of the chemical constituents of concern, particularly those that might be common both to the local groundwater and a contaminant.

Groundwater pollution (also called groundwater contamination) occurs when pollutants are released to the ground and make their way down into type of water pollution can also occur naturally due to the presence of a minor and unwanted constituent, contaminant or impurity in the groundwater, in which case it is more likely referred to as contamination rather than pollution.

With contamination of groundwater from pesticide usage having been confirmed in 23 states,9 it has been esti­ mated that nearly 50 million Americans are potentially at risk of expo­ sure to pesticide contaminated groundwater.

Agricultural pesticide contamination may be divided into five cate­. annual sediment flux [7]. The over-withdrawal of groundwater through hand pumps and redox conditions, briefly discussed in the following sections, have triggered the mobilization of arsenic in the GRB groundwater.

Current Magnitude of Groundwater Arsenic Contamination in the GRBCited by: The risk of ground-water contamination by nitrate depends both on the nitrogen input to the land surface and the degree to which an aquifer is vulnerable to nitrate leaching and accumulation.

Variables describing nitrogen input and aquifer vulnerability were estimated and compiled in a national map (figure 1) using procedures described by.

An investigation of groundwater contamination around the Likeng landfill, Guangzhou, was carried out.

Major ions and elements of 34 groundwater samples were measured, and the Piper trilinear diagram and expanded Durov diagram were used to analyze the chemical types and hydro-geochemical processes of the groundwater. The impact of pesticides consists of the effects of pesticides on non-target ides are chemical preparations used to kill fungal or animal pests.

Over 98% of sprayed insecticides and 95% of herbicides reach a destination other than their target species, because they are sprayed or spread across entire agricultural fields. Runoff can carry pesticides into aquatic environments while. Agricultural Resources and Environmental Indicators, chapterpage 1 Water Quality Impacts of Agriculture Agricultural production releases residuals that may degrade the quality of the Nation’s water resources and impose costs on water users.

The extent and magnitude of this degradation is difficult to assess because of its nonpoint. Pollution of groundwater due to industrial effluents and municipal waste in water bodies is another major concern in many cities and industrial clusters in India.

A survey undertaken by Central Pollution Control Board identified 22 sites in 16 states of India as critical for groundwater pollution, the primary cause being industrial effluents. The status of groundwater is not as well known as that of surface water.

However, when groundwater pollution has been found, agriculture is most often cited as the source. Runoff and infiltration of agricultural chemicals from farm fields into water constitute nonpoint source pollution of water. Key words: agricultural chemicals, best management practices, groundwater contamination, irrigation, preferential flow, spatial variability Abstract.

Deep percolation flow below agricultural land can transport nitrate and pesticide residues to underlying groundwater.

Irrigated agriculture in Cited by: Water pollution results from runoff of these chemicals into surface waters or from infiltration of these chemicals into groundwater.

Significant improvement in the quality of U.S. waters since enactment of the Clean Water Act has been due mainly to reductions in point-source pollution from industrial and municipal sources. PRINCETON GROUNDWATER PRESENTS The Groundwater Pollution and Hydrology Course The Remediation These laws and regulations affect all sources of groundwater contamination, including chemical industries, gasoline stations, industrial landfills and lagoons, refineries, hazardous solid waste management remediation courses and books File Size: KB.

Owing to the widespread use of groundwater as a drinking water resource and the persistence of contaminations for decades if not centuries, assessment of human health risks of exposure to mixtures of chemicals and implementation of appropriate, cost-effective remediation strategies are Cited by:.

The above comparisons are useful for visualizing the magnitude of this resource, but they do not reflect how groundwater should be managed. For example, a per capita water use of gallons per person per day 4 is commonly assumed when estimating water use for small towns, public water supply districts, and even private water supplies.The Agricultural Water Quality Program protects state waters and the environment from impairment or degradation due to the improper use of agricultural chemicals while allowing for [email protected]{osti_, title = {Groundwater Contamination in the United States, 2d edition}, author = {Patrick, R.

and Ford, E. and Quarles, J.}, abstractNote = {More than 50% of the US population depends on ground water as its primary source of drinking water, and about 97% of rural households rely on ground water supplies alone. Even though there is a growing reliance on ground water for.